Tag: ARCHITECTURE

Latest from Eden Design …

Diabolo

Eden Design’s latest lighting products made their debut recently at the Biennale Interieur in Kortrijk, Belgium and the KE-ZU showroom has been abuzz ever since. In case you missed it, we have put together your complete guide here!

Diabolo

Diabolo Color Lamp

Designed by Bart Lens, Diabolo evokes images of a solar eclipse, a chesterfield chair or a diabolo toy, this LED light rotates 190° / 360° on its axis and is available as table-lamp, wall lamp or ceiling lamp and in several colours.

diabolo table lamp

Led line

led line 60 corner

Continues lines of light, without limits. Each led module can be cut every 8 cm, this gives architects and lighting designers a lot of flexibility. Designed with a high tech opal diffusor, Led Line is optimised to allow as much light through as possible.

Led line can be installed surface mounted, recessed or as a pendant and offers a lot of control possibilities: DALI, 1-10V and DMX.  Led Line is available in anodized aluminum, black or white finish.

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Oh!led

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In the past OLED has mainly been used for decorative and ambient lighting. The acronym stands for organic light-emitting diode, which produces a natural glare-free effect.

This innovative OLED luminaire has a lumen output of 300lm from a single 144cm², making it the brightest commercially available OLED in the world and makes it perfectly suitable for functional lighting and contemporary designs. Using this technology to its full potential, Bart Lens has crafted a sleek 4.5mm-thick panel of aluminum and glass called ‘oh!led’ for Eden Design.

The minimalist square panel, which houses a Philips brite lumiblade, can rotate 180 degrees while its single axis is capable of twisting in a full circle. This provides the luxury of creating different settings within the home. Oh!Led is available in satin black or satin white with 3000K or 4000K.

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Pinocchio

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Inspired by the growing nose of the wooden puppet that was brought alive, designer Bart Lens invented a light line which grows or dims in length. A wooden fixture which is realized by a real carpenter, the story of Pinocchio. Pinocchio can be used as a floor lamp, wall lamp or hanging lamp.

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FFF – Brazil kicking some more goals …

We found this place a few years ago and it has stuck with us.  Without a doubt we know that it’ll do the same to you.  A wondrous feat of architecture and a prime example of design within a complex landscape of sand and water.

Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan designed this spectacular holiday residence in 2009.  Located in one of the hundreds of rocky islands near the colonial town of Paraty, near São Paulo.

The brief:  design a holiday residence which leaves the natural surrounding untouched, not an easy feat given that the residence is built on a plot of 5 acres and surrounded by dense jungle and ocean.  The house extrudes from a mountain, in a chameleon like way forming two concrete boxes which resemble rocks positioning themselves at the bottom of the mountain, genius given the topography of the site.

Access to the main entrance is by boat.  From the sand, a metallic bridge built over a pool of clear water leads you to the lower level of the house.   The façade, of clear glass stares luxuriously over the sea, protected from the sun by Eucalyptus (let’s hear it for home grown wood, right?!).

Not to be left behind, the interior arising from the spectacular exterior architecture is filled with natural light and bears an air of the greats Barragan, Wright and van der Rohe and is littered with mid-century furniture (sorry, we know it’s Furniture Free Friday, give us a break) designed by the likes of George Nakashima, Luis Barragan, Lina Bo Bardi, Sérgio Rodrigues, Joaquim Tenreiro and José Zanine Caldas.

Like all that wasn’t enough, (and here’s the part we really love) Kogan declares part of the influence for the architecture of the house to be from film, from the greats of history, Bergman, Fellini and Warhol.

It’s heaven, right?

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South Coast Boast …

There is nothing new in architecture holding a firm relationship with landscape and site.  Leading the way in this harmonious affiliation is the immensely talented husband and wife duo of Casey Brown Architecture.

The firm comprises Rob Brown taking to the helm of the architectural works and Caroline Casey designing stunning often wood based furniture no doubt destined to grace the built works of the firm.

Recently completing a large set of works in Jamberoo, outside of Sydney on the South Coast of N.S.W. is a project that adds to their incredible portfolio and testament to their devotion to the synchronization of architecture and the outdoors.

The Jamberoo Farm House responded to a brief from the client seeking a new residence, guest accommodation and large entertaining areas.  Overall, the new structures had to blend with existing structures on the site which were to be retained.

The product becomes an integrated and private village of contemporary farm houses which comfortably find themselves atop a rolling sprawl of greenery, leading the eye to the far views of the ocean.

Three large gable roofed buildings sit together in such a way to create viewpoints to the stunning landscape, each one enjoying its own view from the large glassed elevations.  Fusing together timber and glass in such a way the structures provide the ease and charm of farm housing whilst allowing the highly stylized nature of the design to be appreciated.

Architect Rob Brown’s understanding of contemporary architecture which holistically incorporates landscape, topography, climate, natural light and lifestyle forces the beholder into comparisons with the great Frank Lloyd Wright.

Check out a portion of their other projects below.  The incredible work of Casey Brown is a reason enough for us to get out and enjoy this country!  Seeya later big smoke!

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The Green Square Architecture Affair …

Green Square, a complex intersection in Alexandria, a neighbourhood packed with design practices, furniture showrooms, Australia’s #1 business park, a heap of creative go-getters, and the home of KE-ZU looks set to become home to a bustling epicentre of culture for the ever growing area just south of central Sydney – said to be Australia’s largest urban development at this time.

A competition was run recently, reaching far and wide internationally for architecture submissions for the design of a public library and plaza.  The winning competition announced and the winning entrant were Sydney locals Felicity Stewart and Matthias Hollenstein in association with Colin Stewart Architects.

From over 160 entries, Stewart and Hollenstein’s proposal was chosen, the exciting design incorporates a subterranean library, exposed internal garden, a public “jam” room for budding musicians and technology rooms.

Their proposal, which creates public space focussing on green areas touted itself as “a business centre, also an entertainment venue, a new innovative library creating an urban living room, and an outdoor plaza becomes a meeting place where friends can shop, dine and play”.

Now doesn’t that sound great for our developing community!  Glenn Murcott AO, Architect and competition juror says of the space:

A local winner, this is not only a superb solution, it’s going to be a wonderful scheme and a wonderful place to be for the people of Green Square.

Sounds a treat.

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A KE-ZU Tribute …

Recently the world said goodbye to a great – Oscar Niemeyer – Brazilian architect who can be credited with much more than just assisting in the birth of modernist architecture. Oscar recently passed just shy of his 104th birthday leaving behind him a repertoire of internationally highly regarded work spanning 78 years including the architecture of the planned city Brasilia (to become Brazil’s capital city), assisting in the UN headquaters of New York City with architectural mentor Le Corbusier and courageous buildings which take pride of place in the Brazilian architectural collection.

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YOU-ZU: Caroline Casey

THIS WEEK WE ARE CHUFFED TO HAVE THE ALWAYS DELIGHTFUL CAROLINE CASEY ON BOARD.
ONE HALF OF THE BRILLIANT CASEY BROWN PARTNERSHIP, CAROLINE’S FURNITURE HAS BEEN SELECTED FOR RESIDENTIAL, HOSPITALITY AND COMMERCIAL USE GLOBALLY AS WELL AS THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA‘S PERMANENT COLLECTION.
FOR MORE ON HER BEAUTIFUL WORKS DROP BY THE CASEY BROWN WEBSITE.  TO HEAR ABOUT HER GROUNDBREAKING NEW TIMBER AND CARBON FIBRE 14 SEAT TABLE: “FEATHERLIGHT”, CHECK OUT THE VIDEO OVER AT INDESIGNLIVE.COM.AU.
The CaseyBrown Blog is also up and running offering great architectural insight direct from the team.
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Very Gehry: Crinkly Wrinkly & Fascination With The Fold…

Only one year on from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) announcing Frank Gehry as it’s architect charged with refurbishment of their Ultimo based Business Faculty: the design has been unveiled.

Today in Sydney the “Crinkly, Wrinkly” faculty building with a glass and brick facade was unveiled with Gehry conceding controversy as an inevitable hurdle in Sydney-siders eventually coming to love the building.

junk is built in cities around the world and nobody really complains… This is a small building in the context of Sydney I don’t think it is going to destroy the town, I promise.

With admission that the building was very much designed from the inside – out, Mr Gehry has via lengthy consultation with student and staff bodies, avoided construction of a monolith unable to serve it’s primary internal purposes, effectively, whilst promoting interactivity.  It’s function as a mini-city within the fabric of it’s community was at the fore of the design process.

Externally the wrinkle and fold in one facade is attributed to the challenge of making a large scale architectural development of any kind; humane.  On the Harris Street frontage, the jutting angles of multi-stroey glass sheets juxtaposes wonderfully.

The 81 year old Gehry concluded by saying that once built he was confident the buildings would be embraced by the community.  The $150M project is due for completion in 2014.

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Grand Designs Australia…

Since 1999 the commanding, measured commentary of Britain’s Kevin McCloud has been synonymous with the voyeurism of following everyday Brits embarking on their own building projects.

Quite aside from the varied approaches to design and construction that are showcased, what has reinforced the Grand Design format’s overwhelming success both in the UK and here in Australia is that at the core of the subject are very human stories.

We’d challenge anyone to watch this show without becoming invested in the process on some level: straight-up poor taste, overwhelming lack of experience or a run of bad luck, we are only able to carve out our opinions and draw conclusion on the success or failure of the builds because of the unique window Grand Designs gives us into these often drawn out transformations.

Excitingly, this week, the first Season of Grand Designs Australia kicks off and is being heralded as a more than worthy spin-off.  Having filmed for over a year already, we are given a quintessentially Australian flavour right from the first episode:

…from rebuilding a labour of love in the Victorian bush after it was burnt to the ground in the Black Saturday bush fires; to transforming a tiny corner car park into five level home in the urban jungle; and a cyclone proof, tropical tree house that is windowless and based on the shape of a 50 cent piece…

Ably taking the reins locally is Melburnian Peter Maddison of Maddison Architects.  With over 25 years experience his own projects include a huge range of award-winning residential and commercial work, Peter’s understanding of Australian architecture, climate, culture and history give the commentary and interpretative analysis a strong and insightful context.

In an era where “overnight home renovation” shows and “handy hints segments” wax lyrical on the ease of  quick-fix residential “design” and bemoan the need to invest time and planning, it is buoying to see Australian content focussed on achieving quality and substance in realistic time-frames under realistic pressures.

You can’t miss this!

It all starts at 8.30pm this Thursday, October 21st exclusive to the Lifestyle Channel.

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Knock Knock…

image (c) Ross Heathcote

For the nosey parker or latent sticky beak in all of us there is a way to satiate that niggling curiosity about what lies behind the “PRIVATE” sign and beyond those barricades for “STAFF ONLY”… an event run by the Historic Houses Trust so fantastic that it opens doors across Sydney allowing you, for one day: access to sites unseen – SYDNEY OPEN 2010.

From architectural icons to secret and hidden places, award-winning contemporary designs to much-loved heritage buildings, industrial shells to creative adaptations and state-of-the-art sustainable living projects, Sydney Open will open your eyes to the past, present and future of Sydney’s built environment.

It’s all happening over the weekend of Saturday the 6th and Sunday November 7th.

Head over here to get your tickets!

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YOU-ZU: Joel Sampson

HASSELL ARE ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S LARGEST DESIGN PRACTICES,  COVERING ARCHITECTURE, INTERIORS, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND MORE… WE SPOKE TO THE EVER-BUBBLY, ALWAYS BUSY, JOEL SAMPSON OF THE INTERIORS TEAM, WHO HAS RECENTLY BEEN HEAVILY INVOLVED IN THE HUGE REFURBISHMENT OF THE SHANGRI-LA, SYDNEY AND ASSORTED NOVOTEL LOCATIONS.

TO GET A GRASP ON THE EXTENT OF HASSELL’S EXPERTISE IN ALL IT’S FIELDS OF PRACTICE CLICK YOUR WAY TO HASSELL.COM.AU

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