Category: FFF – Furniture Free Friday

Furniture Free Friday | ActiWait

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Amelie Künzler and Sandro Engel are ushering in new generation of traffic light buttons, with their design ActiWait, which allows pedestrians to play virtual ping pong as they wait for the light to turn green.

IdeeSeite_01-01

Recently installed in the city of Hildesheim, Germany, ActiWait transforms boring waiting times into positive experiences. Through a touch screen which is installed in the upper shell of the button, people can interact with each other across the street.

These Traffic Lights Let You Play Pong With Random Strangers

Want ActiWait in your city?  Support the idea here.

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Furniture Free Friday | Let there be light …

Calvin Klein’s New York Apartment, designed by Joseph D’Urso, 1976

Calvin Klein’s New York Apartment, designed by Joseph D’Urso, 1976 From The NYT Book of Interior Design and Decoration. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

AnotherMag is a frequent source of amusement and inspiration here at KE-ZU and Steven Holt’s latest article “In Praise of Track Lighting” is no exception.

Tracing its history , applications and even pop culture references, along with a series of vintage pics, Holt certainly has us looking at track lighting in new ways

 Love it or hate it, no other lighting fixture offers the same level of performance, versatility, and style as track lighting. Here are 10 pictures from decades past to prove it says Holt.

Attention to Detail, 1979, by Herbert H. Wise

Attention to Detail, 1979, by Herbert H. Wise. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Remodelling Your Home, 1979

Remodelling Your Home, 1979 Courtesy of Sunset Books. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Planning & Remodelling Kitchens, 1979

Planning & Remodelling Kitchens, 1979. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Better Homes & Gardens: Your Walls & Ceilings, 1983

Better Homes & Gardens: Your Walls & Ceilings, 1983. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Your Walls & Ceilings, 1983

Your Walls & Ceilings, 1983. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

From Decorating With Plants, 1980

From Decorating With Plants, 1980. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

The New Decorating Book, 1981 © Better Homes and Gardens

The New Decorating Book, 1981 © Better Homes and Gardens. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Interiors for Today, 1974

Interiors for Today, 1974. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

Wall Systems & Shelving, 1981

Wall Systems & Shelving, 1981. Photo Courtesy of AnotherMag

See the full article here.

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Furniture Free Friday | Pitarque Robots

Advertising agent Javier Acros Pitarque has combined his profession with his childhood passion for robots creating this series of unique, handcrafted creatures.

The robots are made up of parts that have their own history. The central body is formed from tins, boxes and parts of old machines, in a process of ‘urban archaeology’ that seeks out pieces from the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s such as television buttons, photo and film cameras, torches, gramophones, milometers and voltmeters, high in aesthetic value but little appreciated in industrial design.

Pitarque’s next challenge is to find a sponsor for an app for smarthphones tables in which anyone can create their own robot!

robotos

Step inside the factory and see how these creatures are made.

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Spotlight | Shine

Designed by acclaimed designer Arik Levy for EMU, Shine’s elegant and versatile personality is suitable for multiple residential, hospitality or contract applications. Use of aluminium as the essential material not only makes this collection extremely light and functional but also highly weather resistant and practical to use in coastal areas.

shine arik levy

Shine appears as a complete collection, conceived for dining and relaxation.All elements of this outdoor furniture range are available in new and original colours.


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FFF – Happy Halloween Part 2

Modern Scandinavian furniture is the perfect backdrop for mystery and horror in Grady Hendrix’s Horrorstor: A Novel

Something strange is happening at the Orsk furniture superstore in Cleveland, Ohio. Every morning, employees arrive to find broken Kjerring wardrobes, shattered Bracken glassware, and vandalized Liripip sofabeds-clearly, someone or something is up to no good. To unravel the mystery, five young employees volunteer for a long dusk-til-dawn shift-and they encounter horrors that defy imagination.

Along the way, author Grady Hendrix infuses sly social commentary on the nature of work in the new 21st century economy. A traditional haunted house story in a contemporary setting (and full of contemporary fears), Horrorstor comes conveniently packaged in thform of a retail catalogue, complete with illustrations of ready-to-assemble furniture and other, more sinister accessories.

Copy courtesy of Book Depository

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FFF – Happy Halloween Part 1

Photo courtesy of curbed.com

Here at KE-ZU we love any excuse to dress up and embrace an alter ego (or at least this blogger does!)

So when Halloween comes around costumes are planned well ahead of time, usually before a party invite is received.

In case you forgot or are yet to find a Halloween costume, we present to you Katherine Wisniewski‘s Ultimate Guide to Dressing Like an Architect for Halloween.

Wisniewski provides tips on dressing up as Le Corbusier to Zaha Hadid,Daniel Libeskind, Charles Renfro, Denise Scott Brown and many more. You can see the complete guide here.

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Costume inspiration: Denise Scott Brown, principal at Venturi Scott Brown. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

“Whichever of these genius’ costumes you use, remember to keep your tone quixotic, your facial expression thoughtful, and, when your friends admit they don’t know who you even are, your demeanor aghast. Note: to make it more spooky, feel free to add the word “dead” in front of the costume, but, be forewarned, it gets less funny if they actually are dead,” says Wisniewski.

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Costume inspiration: Charles Renfro, principle at Diller, Scofidio, Renfro. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

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Costume inspiration: Adolf Loos, who wrote Ornament and Crime. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

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Costume inspiration: Daniel Libeskind, designer of Berlin’s Holocaust Museum. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

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Costume inspiration: Le Corbusier, legendary French modernist. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

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Costume inspiration: Zaha Hadid, Pritzker prize winner. Photo courtesy of curbed.com

So, which will you choose?

 

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FFF – To The Milk Bar! …

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The classic corner-milk bar is ingrained into Australia’s rich history. You’d be hard-pressed to find somebody who doesn’t remember a malt milkshake, a big serving of hot chips and a mixed-grill menu, available cheap as chips (pun intended) and offered just around the corner under a racy Chiko Roll poster.

Some of these institutions still exist, yet often they’re simply mere traces of warm memories in the form of architectural relics in suburban and rural areas. Another Aussie institution, the ABC, recently highlighted a new traveling exhibition titled Selling an American Dream: Australia’s Greek Cafes which highlights the contribution Greek immigrants have made to our society through the introduction of the milk bar.

Hear the excerpt from ABC National Radio and see a small collection of the exhibition below.

Capital Milk Bar in Wagga Wagga (X. Stathis, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives)

Capital Milk Bar in Wagga Wagga (X. Stathis, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives)

The Star Milk Bar in Darwin, NT, 1948 (Photo courtesy Papadonakis family, National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

The Star Milk Bar in Darwin, NT, 1948 (Photo courtesy Papadonakis family, National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

California Cafe, Nyngan, NSW in the mid-late 1930s (Photo by Frank Hurley, courtesy J. Varvaressos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

California Cafe, Nyngan, NSW in the mid-late 1930s (Photo by Frank Hurley, courtesy J. Varvaressos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

Astoria Cafe in Hunter St, Newcastle, circa late 1940s (Photo courtesy N. Raftos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives.)

Astoria Cafe in Hunter St, Newcastle, circa late 1940s (Photo courtesy N. Raftos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives.)

The Zantiotis brothers at the Busy Bee Café, 1940s. (Gunnedah and District Historical Society)

The Zantiotis brothers at the Busy Bee Café, 1940s. (Gunnedah and District Historical Society)

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FFF – Seeing The Unseen …

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Lara Zankoul celebrates thought by exposing feelings that the naked eye may not be able to see in her latest collection The Unseen. 

The idea behind The Unseen (colloquially known as “under/over water”) is to reveal through these images the hidden aspects of feelings which affect people on a personal level, exposing a duality between our feelings and what we allow others to see; sentiments which we may hold such as paranoia, shallowness, patience, jealousy etc.

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy larazankoul.com

Image courtesy larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Through these beautifully crafted images, Zankoul helps us reason with our struggles and ourselves and evidence a need for empathy and understanding. The entire collection can be seen here and the video below is a ‘making of’ the shoot.

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FFF – Zoom! Air Driving! …

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

We loved the images in our post about Jacob Munkhammer’s flying Citroën cars so much we had to widen the field and show the French artist Renaud Marion’s superb series titled Air Drive.

Marion snaps the perfect blend of architecture + automobile, carefully extracting the wheels from the classics to make them appear airborne. Touted as “retro-futuristic” (which we love!) these vintage hovercrafts seem so carefree!  Well, perhaps aside from the Mercedes below, the owner of which may have to attempt to rid themselves of a questionable parking ticket.

The challenge for you here is, can you name all of the cars?

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

Image courtesy Renaud Marion

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FFF – Now You See It …

Image courtesy stpmj

Image courtesy stpmj

… Now you don’t…

Each year the Socrates Sculpture Park in New York City hosts a competition that welcomes proposals for large-scale installation works exploring  “contemporary interpretations of the architectural folly”.

New York design company stpmj created the aptly titled entry Invisible Barn. The structure almost seamlessly integrates with its surroundings, giving the illusion of transparency.  Its construction ​​of wood and tarpaulin with mirror film allows its facets to reflect the natural surroundings.

Image courtesy stpmj

Image courtesy stpmj

They say the project is

a visual illusion that blurs the perceptual boundary between the folly and the site, allows the folly to be disappeared and invisible in nature, reconstructing the landscape of the site.

A quote almost as beautiful as the architectural feat itself.

Image courtesy stpmj

Image courtesy stpmj

Image courtesy stpmj

Image courtesy stpmj

Voids cut within the façade of the structure enable visitors to physically interact with the barn and witness the change between what is reflected and what is projected. A truly beautiful idea, we’re sure philosophers could have a field day with this one.

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