Come see us at Melbourne Indesign 2014! …

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Melbourne Indesign 2014 (see our campaign from August 2013 here) is all about collaboration and designer stories.  Matched by our mutual love of wood, we’ve partnered with Tongue n Groove in Melbourne’s Richmond and it’s easy to see why: not only are they a great bunch of people, they’re also industry leaders in timber flooring.  The incredible Tongue n Groove showroom is to be transformed for the two-day event with styling collaboration by our Lidia and Yael with Francesca from Tongue n Groove. You’ll be able to navigate your way to KE-ZU at Tongue n Groove [575 Church Street] by using the Melbourne Indesign 2014 map and smartphone app.

Jaime Hayon and his design: the bd Barcelona Low Lounger

Jaime Hayon and his design: the bd Barcelona Low Lounger

Oscar Tusqets and friend Salvador Dali with Tusquets' design: Fontal for Expormim

Oscar Tusquets and friend Salvador Dali with Tusquets’ design: Fontal for Expormim

We’re taking the opportunity to launch two brands new to KE-ZU: Expormim and Parachilna with furniture and lighting from Jaime Hayon and  Oscar Tusquets. We’ve added other new pieces by Jaime Hayon for bd Barcelona and Bernhardt Design then set it all off with designs by Eerio Aarnio and JM Ferrero for Vondom.

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When you do manage attend at some point over the Friday or Saturday, make sure you take part in our Instagram competition – we love a giveaway and this year you could take home one of the collectable Jaime Hayon Gardenias vases!  Snap a photo of your favourite product and check for details at the Tongue n Groove showroom!

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FFF – To The Milk Bar! …

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The classic corner-milk bar is ingrained into Australia’s rich history. You’d be hard-pressed to find somebody who doesn’t remember a malt milkshake, a big serving of hot chips and a mixed-grill menu, available cheap as chips (pun intended) and offered just around the corner under a racy Chiko Roll poster.

Some of these institutions still exist, yet often they’re simply mere traces of warm memories in the form of architectural relics in suburban and rural areas. Another Aussie institution, the ABC, recently highlighted a new traveling exhibition titled Selling an American Dream: Australia’s Greek Cafes which highlights the contribution Greek immigrants have made to our society through the introduction of the milk bar.

Hear the excerpt from ABC National Radio and see a small collection of the exhibition below.

Capital Milk Bar in Wagga Wagga (X. Stathis, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives)

Capital Milk Bar in Wagga Wagga (X. Stathis, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives)

The Star Milk Bar in Darwin, NT, 1948 (Photo courtesy Papadonakis family, National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

The Star Milk Bar in Darwin, NT, 1948 (Photo courtesy Papadonakis family, National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

California Cafe, Nyngan, NSW in the mid-late 1930s (Photo by Frank Hurley, courtesy J. Varvaressos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

California Cafe, Nyngan, NSW in the mid-late 1930s (Photo by Frank Hurley, courtesy J. Varvaressos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives, Macquarie University)

Astoria Cafe in Hunter St, Newcastle, circa late 1940s (Photo courtesy N. Raftos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives.)

Astoria Cafe in Hunter St, Newcastle, circa late 1940s (Photo courtesy N. Raftos, from the ‘In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians’ National Project Archives.)

The Zantiotis brothers at the Busy Bee Café, 1940s. (Gunnedah and District Historical Society)

The Zantiotis brothers at the Busy Bee Café, 1940s. (Gunnedah and District Historical Society)

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FFF – Seeing The Unseen …

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Lara Zankoul celebrates thought by exposing feelings that the naked eye may not be able to see in her latest collection The Unseen. 

The idea behind The Unseen (colloquially known as “under/over water”) is to reveal through these images the hidden aspects of feelings which affect people on a personal level, exposing a duality between our feelings and what we allow others to see; sentiments which we may hold such as paranoia, shallowness, patience, jealousy etc.

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy larazankoul.com

Image courtesy larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Image courtesy http://larazankoul.com

Through these beautifully crafted images, Zankoul helps us reason with our struggles and ourselves and evidence a need for empathy and understanding. The entire collection can be seen here and the video below is a ‘making of’ the shoot.

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Interview: Kenneth Cobonpue’s Fan Coral …

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Kenneth Cobonpue, his namesake furniture brand and its accessories sidekick Hive [design by hive] have made their presence on the international stage by utilising vernacular materials from their native Philippines to expertly craft their wares, more often than not inspired in form by the strong cultural roots in their Southeast Asian country.

Continuing with their mantra is Kenneth’s latest release Fan Coral, a resourceful art piece. The oceans surrounding the Philippines are a breeding ground for the Gorgonian, collectively known as sea fans or sea whips and thus seems the inspiration for this wonderful piece.

KENNETH COBONPUE FAN CORAL SCREEN2

KENNETH COBONPUE FAN CORAL SCREEN1 The beauty of Fan Coral is two fold: its material composition is comprised of off-cuts and leftover materials from other projects (steel, GI wire and steel plate) and only two were made (of differing sizes, H1438xW1500 & H1835xW1138): thus ensuring its sustainability credentials and individualism are continued important factors.

We had the pleasure of obtaining the following information about Fan Coral from Kenneth Cobonpue, the man himself:

KE-ZU: What was the inspiration for Fan Coral?

KC: Natural life has always inspired me.  I find beauty in the graceful motion of fan corals and in every lacy detail of its fans. 

KE-ZU: What materials were used?  We understand that they were salvaged from waste from other product? 

KC: Steel, GI wire, Steel plate.

KE-ZU: What is the manufacture process? 

KC: Making the Coral Fan is like making a one-of-a-kind art sculpture in the tradition of bending steel.  I had to engineer the way the extremely thin hand-coiled steel strips hold up on the frame of the fans.  The steel plate and metal frames were formed out of the jig.

KE-ZU: What other uses for waste/leftover materials does KC employ?

KC: In design, the Retaso is one of the collections I made out of discarded wood pieces. The design consciously eludes waste and shuns excess.  Constructed of small pieces of wood fastened with dowels, the finished pieces in this collection are at once lightweight and sturdy

KE-ZU: Many of KC’s furniture pieces could be considered art pieces, why this move into sculpture?

KC: The Fan Coral actually isn’t really a sculpture in the strict sense of being purely aesthetic. It’s actually a screen that is sculptural in its design and appeal, which is something that I do put into many of my pieces.

Will there be more art pieces to follow? 

KC: Yes, in fact I made a circus-themed display featuring stools that resemble audiences of varying characters, brightly painted accent tables with legs in whimsical shapes, miniature cages that serve as accent pieces, even a classic spring-style cannon made out of wire mesh. 

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MMM – Brushy One-String …

Brushy One-String

Have you ever felt like the odds were stacked against you?   We reckon Brushy One-String has. His little mate is a guitar with just one string!

Luciano Blotta, a Jamaican filmmaker discovered our newest friend Brushy while filming his documentary Rise Up.

Born Andrew Chin, Brushy is the product of a musical family who possesses the enviable ability to inspire and move his audience, which thanks to the internet is now almost 6 million strong.

Brushy has told the world that the one-string effect came to him in a dream, taking on the sub-consciously set challenge and showing us all how it’s done.

Take a look at “Chicken in the Corn” performed by Brushy with his uni-string below!

 

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ABALLS …

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ABALLS Suspension Light designed by Jaime Hayon for Parachilna.

“Jaime, we are looking for a lamp, straightforward but imbued with the spirit of PARACHILNA: rich materials, traditional skills blended with artisanal craftsmanship and impeccable finishes. Design- wise…you take care of it.” So began the creation of ABALLS, a collection that combines the world class craftsmanship skills of Bosa with the traditional artistry of hand blown glass.

Ceramics and blown glass are linked by a polished brass ring. The dimmer’s control lever is also made of polished brass. The ABALLS collection includes a chandelier, hanging lamps available in three different sizes and table lamps available in two sizes.

Now available at KE-ZU!

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Leda …

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Leda Armchair designed by Salvador Dali for BD Barcelona.

“A chair can even be used for sitting on, but with just one condition: that we be uncomfortably seated” Salvador Dali

During the 1930′s in Paris, Jean-Michel Frank, a furniture maker and decorator of great repute, was on very good terms with Dali and together they worked on several ideas. In the 1990′s a group of experts led by Oscar Tusquets set themselves the task of of turning the furniture that Dali had drawn for Jean-Michel Franke into a reality.

More art than furniture this iconic design is now offered in a limited release ‘black’ model to mark the 20th Anniversary of the “Maestro’s” death.

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Casa Gran …

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The Casa Gran Armchair and Sofa designed by Studio Expormim for Expormim.

Casa Gran was the best seller sofa of Expormim during the 80’s. Its winding parallel rattan enfolds all its generous upholstery, creating a soft and comfortable sofa.

Now available from KE-ZU!

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Nido …

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The Nido Armchair designed by Rafa Garcia for Sancal.

Nido, Spanish for nest, means home to a number of species and inspired Rafa García to create this small armchair. The seat or “nest” is supported by a steel or hand-crafted ash wood frame. The upper part provides “branches” into which a comfortable seat is fixed.

Now available at KE-ZU!

 

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Chinoz …

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Chinoz Lamp designed by Jaime Hayon for Parachilna.

Now available at KE-ZU!

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